Budgeting

Financial Advice Keeping You Broke & In Debt

The post Financial Advice Keeping You Broke & In Debt appeared first on Penny Pinchin' Mom.

Financial advice is great – when it is the right type of advice.  There are tips and strategies that can make you money.  However, there is also a lot of advice that will do nothing but keep you broke and in debt.  These are things you don’t want to listen to.

I remember when I was younger, my mom told me that I had to get a credit card because it would be important for any emergencies which came my way.  I followed her advice and got a credit card. And, wouldn’t you know it, the first time I used it was for an emergency. Or, what I thought was an emergency.

I woke one snowy morning and someone had hit my car — and fled. No note on my windshield.  Just a dented door with green paint. I was devastated.  I had worked so hard to afford that car.  Now, here I was having to pay money to get it back to the condition it once was.  Since I was broke, I followed my mom’s advice.  I used my credit card.

I remember watching it go through the reader.  I signed my name and I was done.   When the bill came the following month, I paid that minimum payment. I decided that credit cards were pretty slick!  They were simple to use and it was the way to get what I wanted now and I could just pay for it later.

In hindsight, my mom would have been better to teach me the importance of saving.  That way, I would have cash on hand to cover my emergencies and not rely on plastic.

Sadly, this is the way many people live their financial life. The take the advice of friends and family and follow it rather than listening to financial experts.  Here are some common financial advice myths.

 

BAD FINANCIAL ADVICE YOU MAY BELIEVE

1. Some debt is good to have

I hear time and time again that you have to have debt in order to have a good credit score.  That type of financial advice is pure nonsense.

There is no such thing as “good debt.” Debt is money you owe someone and it is never a good thing. It is, however, sometimes necessary in order to purchase a house or a vehicle.  While not what one would call good debt, it may be a debt you need to have in order to live.

The type of debt no one should have is credit card debt.  Ever.  There should never be any instance where you owe more on your credit card in any given month than the amount of money you have in the bank to pay it in full.

Continuing to accrue debt that you can not pay in full each month makes no sense at all.

 

2. You need a credit card for an emergency

My story above is all too common for many.  The opposite is true.  You can have a credit card, but should not use it only for an emergency.  However, if that is how you plan to pay for emergencies, you are setting yourself up for financial trouble.

We all know that emergencies will happen.  There is nothing we can do to prevent them.  However, the smart thing to do is to plan ahead for the unknown.  This is why a fully funded emergency account makes more sense than a credit card.

If you think about it, having to deal with the stress of the situation is bad enough.  Add to it the thought of increasing your debt in order to deal with it just makes the situation a work.  Now, you not only had to deal with the broken furnace but now, you will have to find a way to pay for it as your monthly bills just went up.

Your emergency fund will come to your rescue when it is needed.  Knowing the funds are there to help cover those expenses will instantly make you feel better when dealing with a stressful situation.

 

3.  Leasing a vehicle is better

This is the one that makes me scratch my head.  When you lease a vehicle, you never own it.   Instead, you are stuck in perpetual car payments. How does that make any sense at all?

The common reason many say they lease is that they don’t have to worry about having an older vehicle.  They know that they are driving a new vehicle every few years.  The truth is, if you take care of your car, your vehicle can last you for years.  I drove our minivan for more than 13 years!  And, when I was ready for an upgrade, my vehicle was 3 years old.  Nothing new here!

If you lease a vehicle for 3 years at $300 a month, you will pay nearly $11,000 to drive the vehicle.  At the end of 3 years, you give it back. You have nothing to show for it.  You have just thrown away $11,000.  Now, you have to either lease again or decide to purchase your vehicle.  You are starting over on those payments.

However, had you purchased a vehicle that would offer you the same monthly payment of $300 for 3 (or even 4) years, you would own your car.  You now have $300 a month income freed up to do with what you wish.

The smart move would be to save that $300 monthly amount so that in 8, 9 or even 10 years when you need a new car, you can pay for it in cash.  This money will also more than cover some of the repairs that may be needed as your vehicle ages.

 

4.  Renting is throwing your money away

If you rent, you probably this financial advice frequently.  It is common for people to feel that it makes more sense to buy a house as your money is going to build up equity in your property.  And, truthfully, for some people renting is a waste of money.

But not for all.

There are situations where you do not have the funds for your down payment.  It could also be a time in your life when you know there will be the potential for relocating to a new city or venturing down a new career path.

By renting, you also avoid the additional costs of home maintenance, insurance, and other expenses which go with owning a home.

The best way to know this one is to look carefully at your own budget and personal situation. If renting works for you, then that is the path you should follow.

 

5.  You should always buy a new car

Turn on any television program and you will see ads sharing low-interest rate payments to lure you into wanting that new car.  These ads make it sound extremely affordable and tempting.  But don’t fall for it.

The truth is that when you purchase a new car, it will depreciate most quickly in the first few years you own it.  In fact, most cars will lose half their value every four years.  For instance, if your car is $25,000 brand new, in just four years it will be worth $12,000.  Add another four years and now the car is worth just $6,000.

You should not be a car that is too old.  Instead, purchase a late model car with lower miles. It will cost less to operate and will more quickly pay for itself.

 

6.  You must go to college

Many high school students believe that they must go to college when they graduate. However, that is not necessarily the right decision for everyone.  Not all careers or jobs will require a college education.  And, if you do not have the funds to pay for it, you can certainly rack up quite a bit of student loan debt.

If you happen to select a career that requires a secondary education, then it can be worth the cost. But, make certain you have the passion needed to carry you through.  Otherwise, you may find yourself amongst the nearly 60% who drop out, you will find yourself left with a mountain of student loan debt and nothing to show for it.

Rather than attend a college, consider a trade school instead.  Or, if you know for sure you do want to go to school, spend some time trying different jobs to figure out where your passion lies.  There is no rule that says you have to start college immediately after you finish high school.  Know what you want to do and then decide where to go for your education.

Getting financial advice from family and friends, be it solicited or not, can be helpful.  However, just make sure that what they say makes sense and do your homework.  Following what they say can often lead you down a path of increased debt and unhappiness.

Please note that I am not a certified financial advisor and the information shared on this site is based on my personal experiences.   It is important you consult with a tax or financial professional for assistance for your financial situation.

The post Financial Advice Keeping You Broke & In Debt appeared first on Penny Pinchin' Mom.

Source: pennypinchinmom.com

DIY, Family Finance, Home Buying, Mortgage Tips

9 Things I Wish I Had Known About Owning My First Home (Before I Bought It)

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Years before I ever dreamed of homeownership for myself, I was an HGTV connoisseur. In college, I double majored in “Property Virgins” and “House Hunters” and spent hours glued to the TV with my roommate, ogling other people’s granite countertops.

Fast forward nearly a decade, and the time had arrived for me to purchase my own home. (No granite countertops here—my house was more like the “before” scene in an episode of “Fixer Upper”).

Not surprisingly, TV homeownership didn’t prepare me for the real thing. There are lots of lessons I’ve had to learn the hard way.

If you’re gearing up for your own journey into homeownership, turn off the TV and gather ’round. I’ll fill you in on a few things I wish I had known beforehand, and a few surprises (some happy, some frustrating) that I encountered along the way.

1. A beautiful yard takes work

That lawn’s not going ti cut itself

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I never met a succulent that I didn’t kill. Even my fake plants are looking a little wilted right now. But even though I don’t have a green thumb, landscaping and yard maintenance are forever on my to-do list.

Each spring, I spray Roundup with impunity, attempting (and failing) to conquer the weeds. My husband handles mowing and edging.

I’ve slowly started to learn which plants can endure abuse, neglect, and a volatile Midwestern climate. I still have a long way to go in my landscaping journey, but all this work has given me a new appreciation for other people’s lush, beautiful lawns.

When you’re house hunting, keep in mind that those beautiful lawns you see—and that outdoor space you covet—come at a steep price. Either your time and frustration, or a hefty bill for professional landscapers, will be necessary to keep things presentable.

2. You might get a bill for neighborhood improvements

Your property taxes should pay for every improvement to the neighborhood, right? Not necessarily.

When my neighbors came together to petition the city for a speed bump on our busy street, the cost was passed on to us homeowners. It wasn’t covered by property taxes, so we got a bill in the mail a few months later. Surprise!

When you’re preparing to buy a house, make sure you budget for homeownership expenses—not just repair and HOA costs, but those pesky fees that crop up when you least expect them.

3. Brush/trash removal? It works differently in every city

You might not be able to just leave your leaves on the curb…

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As a kid, I spent many fall weekends scooping leaves into yard waste bags that we left on the curb for pickup. But when I became a homeowner, I realized that my early brush with brush removal was unique to the suburb where I grew up. Every city handles it differently, if the city handles it at all.

In Milwaukee, where I live, homeowners can put leaves on the curb for pickup on designated days. For big branches, you need to request a pickup, or potentially dispose of them yourself. Check with your city to find the ordinances and regulations where you live.

4. You’ll want to clean (or hire someone to clean) your nasty windows

Window maintenance was never on my radar as a renter, probably because I never had more than a few windows in an apartment. But then I became the proud owner of many, many windows—and all of them were coated in a thick film of gunk after years of neglect.

After we moved in, I started to tackle the cleaning on my own. But I quickly realized I was getting nowhere fast, and there was no way I could safely clean the exterior windows up in the finished attic.

So, I swallowed my pride and hired window washers. It was some of the best money I’ve ever spent.

5. You may feel a sudden urge to stock up on seasonal decorations

I never looked twice at a $50 wreath or decorative gourd before becoming a homeowner. Now, I have a burgeoning collection of lawn ornaments in the shape of snowmen and spooky cats. Sometimes I don’t even know who I am anymore.

6. You’ll need to create a budget for Halloween candy

Stock up…

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At least I did in my Halloween-loving neighborhood, where the trick-or-treaters come out in droves.

I spent upward of $100 on candy my first year as a homeowner, and most of it was purchased in a panic at the Dollar Store after I noticed that our supply was dangerously low just halfway through the evening.

Now, I stock up in advance and shop with coupons to save a few bucks.

7. DIY renovation is equally rewarding and soul-crushing

Maybe just call someone next time…

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For the first few months after we closed on our house, my husband and I spent every free hour after work and on the weekends ripping out carpeting, pulling nails one by one from the hardwood floors, and scrubbing away at generations’ worth of grime in the bathrooms and kitchen. It was some seriously sick stuff.

Being frugal and ambitious means we can accomplish a lot on a small budget. But acting as our own general contractors became a full-time job on top of both of our full-time jobs.

Simple pleasures like “having a social life” or “Friday night with Netflix” became distant memories. It’s easy now to say it was all worth it, but at the time, I daydreamed about winning the lottery and hiring a team of pros to handle our rehab.

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Watch: Here’s How Low You Can Go in Making an Offer on a Home

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8. My impulse to check real estate listings lingered for a while

When I started house hunting, I obsessively searched for new home listings every day, poring over MLS descriptions and swiping through photos. Reaching for my phone to refresh the realtor.com app became muscle memory.

But after we closed on our house, my impulse to follow the market didn’t disappear overnight. Even though I was a homeowner, I also had a phantom limb where “checking the real estate listings” used to be.

A friend of mine put it best when she wrote about the sensation of loss she experienced when she “no longer had an excuse to occupy [her] free time with these real estate apps.” It’s surprisingly challenging to turn off your home-buying brain after months of being on high alert.

9. You’ll never want to go back to sharing walls

I like my neighbors. I like them even more because, for the most part, I can’t hear them. Gone are the days of people above me making bowling sounds late at night.

Now, I enjoy the sweet, sweet silence of detached living—no adjacent neighbors blasting music or loudly quarreling. All the yard work in the world is worth it for this level of quiet.

The post 9 Things I Wish I Had Known About Owning My First Home (Before I Bought It) appeared first on Real Estate News & Insights | realtor.com®.

Source: realtor.com